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[PODCAST EP00] Live Event Projection – Clem Harrod

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The role of live event projection for events and shows is crucial & demanding. We interview Clem Harrod with CLEMCO.AV to hear how he balances the road, the life, and the pixels.

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Episode zero, of The Production Channel, focuses on the demanding role of event projection for live shows. Stephen turns the tables to interview Clem, who explains his journey of building his business, and personal brand, into CLEMCO.AV from his beginnings working three jobs simultaneously in sports, news, and corporate events. Stemming from his mother’s love of still photography, dance and music, Clem has been a long-time fan of visual art. He realized through his mentors and intense learnings at LMG that “what we do in this industry is an art form. I look at what I do as an event projectionist as an artist. That is my foundation.”

Clem gives us the details on how he has managed to make money doing something his loves while maintaining a connection with family during an often-hectic travel schedule.

“Each person needs to think about their own situation, their own schedule. There are things you can do to maintain that balance of your life, of your family life, while you are gone.”

In his pursuit to educate the next generation of live event professionals, Clem has developed Projection101, a way to pass on knowledge and skill of the craft in an organized curriculum. He explains how sharing information and his life experiences will not only help students become better event projectionists, they will become the architects of their own lives.

Listen to the chatter as Stephen pushes Clem to reveal how he blends all aspects of his world to achieve the vision he has projected for his personal life and CLEMCO.AV.

 

Full Podcast Transcript

Stephen Bowles:
All right, welcome. My name is Stephen Bowles and you’re listening to the Production Channel, where we bring the very best of the production issue. Whether that’s interviews with lead production and staging management, producers and stage callers, or audio/video media servers, or really just down and dirty vendors and how they’re loading in the gear, getting everything going. At the end of the day, we’re trying to bring the production industry to the industry. I’m joined today with Clem Harrod. Clem is a good friend of mine.

Clem Harrod:
Hey.

Stephen Bowles:
Hey, Clem. Someone we’ve been working with, that I’ve been working with over the last couple of weeks and months on what is the Production Channel. Clem, what is it? In your head, what is the Production Channel?

Clem Harrod:
The Production Channel, for me, is just like sitting backstage. We got that down time, we’re talking about things in life, we’re talking about the industry. We’re just talking about the nature of what we do, whether it be the next show that we’re on, or this cool little piece of equipment that just came in, or talking about our kids, or talking about that cool restaurant that we went to, or lounge that we went to, or bar, or whatever. Techs love their dive bars.

Stephen Bowles:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Clem Harrod:
So all that. All that. You know, the Production Channel.

Stephen Bowles:
When Clem and I were talking about it, there’s just not a place that we all go to get this information. We go to Facebook and we look at the best photos or shots that we took backstage of a really cool gig we worked on, or we just directly talk to each other backstage. We’re only seeing each other maybe once every couple of weeks or even months, sometimes even years.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Stephen Bowles:
Just having a place where you can channel that conversation. Production Channel, just like you think. You got your calm and this just the place where the chatter happens across-

Clem Harrod:
Chatter.

Stephen Bowles:
Chatter. Chatter happens across a lot of different disciplines, but all centralized and around production, right? We’re not going to sit here and talk about food blogs or something like that.

Clem Harrod:
No, no, no.

Stephen Bowles:
We’re going to talk about what’s relevant to our industry and things that matter. When we talked about what are we going to do on episode zero, we just went back and forth. I just said, “Clem, we got to get you.” You are not only someone who has really traversed different verticals inside of this industry from, really, sports camera to lead event projectionist but also, you’ve seen the range. Everything from small load ins and breakout rooms to really massive technology and IBM events that have 15, 25, 30,000 people in the room. I think you’ve seen the industry. You also have the pulse of the industry. You really speak well about it.

Clem Harrod:
I love it, I do. I love it.

Stephen Bowles:
You do. Then just knowing you and your family and that balance, I think that it’s right. Anywho, we’re going to dive right in with you, Clem, today. With that, give us any bit of any idea … Like how in the world did you even find this crazy industry that we call that we call production?

production channel - clem harrod - clemco.av - art of event projectionClem Harrod:
This industry, yeah. Well, I had somewhat of an eye for art instilled in me from my mom. She was a still photographer, or, excuse me, she is a still photographer and just loving the arts overall, dancing, music, all of that. For me, what we do in this industry is an art form. I look at what I do as an event projectionist as an artist. That is my foundation.

I understand my foundation and, from there, I took a lot of television production classes in middle school. Then in high school, I went to a special high school where I studied television production for two of my six classes each year. I was bused to a specific school and then I was able to go Florida State from there. At Florida State, I applied for the film school but didn’t get in. Which is perfect because I thought I wanted to be a film editor. I’m not the type of person to be in a box like that, you know? I got to flow. I got to get out. I got to feel things. I got to be a part of, like you said, the pulse. I got to feel the pulse of everything, not just my task. I want to feel everything.

Stephen Bowles:
You would never have done well as a video editor. You’re in a box, in a cave, locked in there until 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning.

Clem Harrod:
Right, right.

Stephen Bowles:
Which is really no different than what you’re doing now, but you’re at least-

Clem Harrod:
Around other people.

Stephen Bowles:
Massive arena and around other people, but working until 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning.

Clem Harrod:
Chatting on the Production Channel.

At Florida State, I learned how to shoot sports, and I learned how to anticipate an athlete’s movement and embrace the whole production aspect of it. Yeah, I was a part of, as a camera operator for Florida State football, but then, from there, I was a producer and a director for basketball, arena football, ice hockey. All of this was in Tallahassee. I learned so many levels of the production industry.

I applied for an internship, my senior year, to everywhere. Every sports team, network, broadcast, wherever. Just looking for my way. Rick Price brought me to Orlando. I interned for the Orlando Magic and O102, what a great experience. Again, I thought I wanted to be an editor and Rick Price was like, “No, with your experience, you’re going out in the field with me. You’re doing the electronic field production.” I was like, “All right, cool. I’ll embrace it. I love it.” September 17 of ’01 is when I started my internship with the Magic. Then, in February of ’02 is when I had my first gig with LMG. I remember my first gig. Steve [Ohmer 00:06:05], who actually brought me in. He recommended me and made those connections for me. I started right in with an Ernst & Young load out.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s fun. You basically, like I think a lot of people did … I, as well, started doing TV production in high school. Then you sort of just running that out. “Well there’s no way I’m going to be a banker.” You just kept pursuing that. Often, people don’t exactly know how TV production is directly going to translate into the real world. How do you actually move that? You put both a line in on sports, with Rick Price, with the Orlando Magic, which is awesome. I want to hear more about that in a second. Then you also put a line in with just traditional, corporate events. LMG’s a rental and staging house based out of Orlando, but nationwide.

Clem Harrod:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stephen Bowles:
You started at load ins, which is a very common thing. That’s awesome. I guess, just tell us how that went. You’re both building up your sports career and you’re building up your freelance, corporate event projectionist career.

Clem Harrod:
Yes.

Stephen Bowles:
How did you do those together, at the same time?

Clem Harrod:
Well, what I didn’t mention, is I was also doing news, at the same time.

Stephen Bowles:
What?

clem harrod - clemco.av - projection cadClem Harrod:
Yeah. You know, when you’re first starting off, you have to pay the bills. You have to have money in your pocket, and you’re just trying to find your way. You don’t know how this industry works, so you’re just trying to figure out … You’re figuring out your way, your niche, and figuring out a place for you to fit in. The news was just a temporary thing. I knew that wasn’t my heart’s desire, that’s not where I wanted to be, but I had to do what I had to do, to get where I wanted to go. I’m running these … At one point, it was three things, three businesses, or three parts of me were running parallel. One was going a little faster than the other. As one started to take off a little more, I let go of the news. The news was the first to go.

Now I have sports, which I was doing the Magic, doing the Rays, Orlando Sentinel varsity sports, high school shoots. I was doing every single thing just to continue to get my foot and my name known. Also, building up my skill set. The same thing was going on on the corporate side. I’m doing load ins, load outs, breakout rooms, a little bit of camera utility or cable page, as it’s called. Barely doing some camera work when it’s like, the whole time, I’m like, I know camera, I can do camera.

Stephen Bowles:
Right.

Clem Harrod:
Those weren’t the jobs that I was being offered.

Stephen Bowles:
There’s a big difference between camera work in sports versus camera work in corporate. Not necessarily in the gear but one-

Clem Harrod:
Mindset.

Stephen Bowles:
Mindset, yep. Not to limit or box in what corporate event camera operators do, because they’re essential. I mean, my background’s live video director. I built significant relationships with a whole bunch of freelance camera ops and couldn’t do it without them. One is way more active than the other.

Clem Harrod:
Yes.

Stephen Bowles:
You would be underneath the hoop, at a Magic game, feet away from these professional athletes, which is just-

Clem Harrod:
Getting run over by these professional athletes.

Stephen Bowles:
Yeah, exactly. Getting run over for them. That’s right. It’s just a little different than a CEO on the stage.

Clem Harrod:
Yes.

Stephen Bowles:
All right, so then, recently, have moved entirely toward live event projection.

Clem Harrod:
Yes.

Stephen Bowles:
Tell me about that. How did that … Why now? Really, how, specifically, have you moved from doing a load in every once in a while, to make an extra couple of bucks, to a career as a professional, freelance projectionist?

Clem Harrod:
Right. There was a need. Basically, there was a need. I would get phone calls and emails, “Hey, are you available these dates? I’d look at my calendar and I’d say, “Yes.” I would either be wide open or I would have to move a couple of things around. Hey, the money was good, the opportunity was there. You say yes to the job, you take the job. Then, “Okay, cool. You’re going to be a projectionist.” You heard that pause?

Stephen Bowles:
Right, pregnant pause.

Clem Harrod:
You heard that pause? That’s exactly what was going on in my mind. It was like, “Okay.” You know, you take the opportunity, you figure it out, because that’s what you do to pay the bills. That’s what you do to work your way in. Fortunately, I had some people that were willing to show me a couple of tricks here and there. I never had the understanding, from the beginning, of what it took.

I’m taking these gigs and, year by year, gig by gig, I’m picking up skills and understanding, “Oh, okay. This is what you do. This is how you manipulate the projector, in order to get this result.” Understanding, “Okay, I do see a little green in that image when I’m color balancing. In order to get rid of that green, okay, I’ll back this out, or I’ll add a little of this, or a little bit of that.” Having the right teachers, over the years, to give me tips here and there, I’ve compiled them to work my way up in the industry, from just doing break outs to doing little mini general sessions, then glorified break out rooms.

All these little things that have led me up to learn how to blend and be a widescreen projectionist. Then, when warping came around, and the curved screens, it’s like, that’s when, for me, that real passion started to develop for the industry. Realize that I’m a professional, an artist at the same time because, I can enjoy being around everybody else when we’re building a project. Then, when it comes to the warping aspect, that’s when … You’ll see me on show site. I’ll set up my little workstation, I’ll set up my candle, I’ll put on my little comfy pants, whatever. For me, that’s like sitting in that edit booth. All those times where I wanted to be an editor and be to myself, in certain aspects. When I’m warping, I can be to myself. I’ll get in my music, I’ll shut out the outside world, and I’ll focus on that screen and that detail.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s interesting. Let’s dive into, specifically, the technical craft of event projection. Just to paint a wide stroke on it, when you go to a large corporate event, anything like that, it’s common now to see a super wide screen, on some level, which is really made up of a series of projectors, left to right-

Clem Harrod:
Yes.

Stephen Bowles:
All blended together.

Clem Harrod:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stephen Bowles:
Clem, as a freelance projectionist, that’s what he’s doing. He’s coming in early, he’s loading in, working with rigging, setting up those projectors and stuff. Tell me … Like you just said, you moved from load ins to now, really front of the line projection where you’re dealing with curved screens, etc. You learn from event to event to event, but it’s often hard to break out of what people’s expectations of you are. Tell me about that. When curved screens came around, did you intentionally take that on as a technology, or a particular niche of production that you wanted to own and be on the front lines of? Did that produce, for you, more of a demand. Now, they knew Clem knew how to pull this off.

Clem Harrod:
It all started with a great teacher of mine. My Obi-Wan Kenobi, if you will, Phil Licari.

production channel - clem harrod - clemco.av - mapping projectionStephen Bowles:
Oh, Philly.

Clem Harrod:
Oh, Philly, that’s my man. All day. We’re working on a show in Vegas … Of course, in Vegas. Large, curved screen, for Chipotle. I’ll never forget it. We’re working there overnight and his computer crashed. He’s a PC guy, and I’m a Mac guy. I’m just over his shoulder, watching him, understanding what’s going on. Picking up things, asking questions, but not too many questions, because people are in their mind, in their workspace. Once his computer crashed, I was like, “You can use mine, I have [inaudible 00:14:37] tool set on here.”

It was that Mac-PC learning curve that just was a little frustrating, at times. He gave me the opportunity to get in there, for a bit, and I just took it on. I embraced it. It was just that change of a mindset of seeing the potential, understanding potential. Realizing that you can grow from here, there is a way that you can take this skillset because you have an understanding of the manipulation of the light. That’s what we’re doing with projection and warping. You have an understanding of the manipulation of light and the fine details to do things and see things that other people don’t. Then, because my wife is an entrepreneur as well, a very successful entrepreneur, then it’s a matter of, okay, how do you monetize this? How do you make your living off of what your gifts are? That’s where I am now. Just trying to understand that I have a skillset that is appreciated and valued, at this time, in the industry. Just going from there.

Stephen Bowles:
Take me through a recent event. One of the more recent … I think you just did one earlier this year with IBM and with Drury Design Dynamics, they’re a great production company. They do massive events.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah.

Stephen Bowles:
IBM’s really been on the frontlines of really doing media servers and projection mapping, really, on larger canvases.

Clem Harrod:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stephen Bowles:
Take us through how you engage an event, weeks out or days out. Certainly, during an actual load in. Once you’re in show, what areas of responsibilities, how do you take a show on? When people are up on the stage, what are you doing? Then, as far as load out and post-event review. Take me through your life cycle of a large-scale event.

Clem Harrod:
Okay, okay. After I get requested to be on a show, or asked my availability, I then ask the show, the name of the show, the AE, the production company, and the venue. All these factors are important to understanding where am I traveling to, which venue am I going to be working in, so I can go back through my memory banks. “Okay, yep, I remember that ballroom.” Understanding who the AE is, so I can just have that direct contact for the questions that I have, to get to the TD, or whomever. Then, who’s the client? Okay, yep, yep, I’m familiar. Drury, okay, cool.

Then it’s a matter of understanding Craig, I’m going to deal with Craig [Muir 00:17:28] as my AE, Drury Design, and then getting all of the necessary documents, as far as the quotes, the drawings, and the schedule. The production schedule is definitely important, so that you have an understanding of the expectations of what needs to be done by when. Then, once I travel to the venue, getting there and understanding the load in, which trucks are coming in, where’s our gear. Now, okay, I know how many projectors I’m going to have, now it’s a matter of separating them, figuring out which lenses match up with which projectors, and what combination match up to which screen.

Then getting with rigging, getting with lighting, getting with the necessary departments so that we can then work together to understand the overall expectations and when you need your time and when I need my time. Then, I’m also building the relationship with the people who are going to be helping me. Whether it be other event projectionists, or stage hands, that I might be sharing video department, as a whole. Okay, understanding that, let me knock out what I need to do and then we’ll trade off stage hands throughout the day. Getting those projectors rigged up to the truss or, if they’re on scaffolding, in the back, building that scaff. Marking our territory and just …

It’s like Lego pieces. That’s how I always equate it to. Just taking those Lego pieces, in a box, dumping them into a ballroom, separating those Lego pieces, which are the cases and equipment, by departments. Then now, we’re coming over here in this little corner and we’re going to start building our little piece to the set. Then the other departments are building their piece. Then all of our pieces come together. Now we’ve got this beautiful little Erector Set of a display, for all to enjoy.

Once the projectors are rigged, screens are up, I’m networking and checking my signal path, making sure my power’s good. Got my projectors converged, for the however many number of screens that I’m dealing with. Then we go through and color balance, making sure that the whites are true white, the blacks are true blacks, and it looks good, the client’s happy. Once the client’s happy, we get in rehearsals. I’m either managing my position as the projectionist only, and making sure that everything is continuing to flow properly. Nothing’s overheating, everybody’s happy, including the projectors. The projectors are happy.

clem harrod - clemco.av - projection mappingStephen Bowles:
Don’t want them blowing up on you.

Clem Harrod:
Don’t want them blowing up on me because, if they blow up on me, then the client’s blowing up on me. Then that’s just not good, overall.

Stephen Bowles:
Then you’re not coming back next year.

Clem Harrod:
Then I’m not coming back next year.

I might be running playback and/or records. That’s my in-show duties. At the end of the show, a matter of … Based on department order and who’s coming down first, waiting for your pulling out your cases and waiting for your projectors to come down. Tear them apart. If I’m dealing with a screen, tear that apart, throw it in a case, and pack it up. Send it off, back to the warehouse. QC to come right back out for it’s next show.

Stephen Bowles:
Tell me a little bit more about that dual role that is often expected of a projectionist. Maybe not in the larger shows, because they might put a body in the playback or record, so that you can just focus on event projection.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Stephen Bowles:
Certainly on those small to medium, if not medium large, events. The general expectation from, at least, the corporate event production side is that you will do another role during show, but load in projection during load in. How much of that was a curve? You came in thinking you’re just loading in gear. Then you’re having to figure out what these playback devices are.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Stephen Bowles:
Then you’re having to learn the nuances of a key pro record, or whatever. Just talk a little about that.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah. It was difficult. Especially starting off with beta decks. Then, okay, we would have this Excels sheet that would basically-

Stephen Bowles:
Yeah.

Clem Harrod:
You plug in the time where the video started, maybe the duration, and then it would calculate your countdown cues. Then they had the turbos or the [cubit 00:22:08]. I remember using this [cubit 00:22:09] system where I felt like a computer programmer, getting in there and typing out certain codes in order to edit the video. You talk about a learning curve, oh my gosh.

Stephen Bowles:
That was just silly.

Clem Harrod:
It was troublesome, at times.

Stephen Bowles:
Right, right.

clem harrod - clemco.av - event projectionClem Harrod:
Especially when you’re not using this every day. You’re being exposed to this piece of equipment on a gig, sometimes for the first time. Then you won’t see it again for almost a year or so, or sometimes you would see it all the time. That would make it difficult. When a product like Playback Pro came along, that’s what made me switch over to a Mac because Playback Pro was Mac-based. It allowed me to see how easy a Mac worked, and I enjoyed it. Then, it’s just, once again, playing on the computer. It felt more natural, it felt easier. It can be difficult, at times, to have that mindset of a projectionist. Then realize that, “Oh hey, we also need you to do playback.”

This happens on shows often. I’m in projection mind, loading in, managing my team and working our goals throughout the day to get to the end result. Then I’ll have a stage manager or an ASM come up to me, “Hey, I’ve got some videos for you. When will we be able to see them?” I’m like, “No, I’m sorry, I’m in projection mind right now. Tomorrow?” Those are some of the responsibilities that come along with running those dual roles.

Stephen Bowles:
I know exactly what you mean. Actually, in the sports and also in touring, right? Concert touring.

Clem Harrod:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Stephen Bowles:
Often, the person who’s a rigger … I went on tour with Maroon 5 or Train, for a series of dates, just directing cameras for them. My camera operators during the night, during the show, were actually the riggers during the day.

Clem Harrod:
Oh wow.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s a common thing that we see in the production industry. Whether it’s the best way to do it, I don’t know. It is a common thing. Well, let’s turn, now, to that work-life balance. Again, you’ve been doing this across different genres of the production industry. Sports, broadcast, and then corporate. Corporate, naturally, has a very freelance, travel-heavy nature and culture about it, which can put a stress on family. You and I are actually going to do a deeper dive into just work-life balance in another episode. Pass us through on that. How have you found that rhythm with your family and work?

Clem Harrod:
Well, you know, it took for me to fail miserably in order for me to realize that there was an end balance. In my mind, I’m constantly thinking about the job, and the next job, and bringing home that money for the month. Almost a narrow-minded approach to what was going on. Not thinking about my family unit as a whole, and that my job is just a means to support my family unit. It became difficult when my wife was the one who was constantly on me about, “Look, you’re gone too much.” I’m working 20 days a month. Then, I eventually narrowed it down to 15. Now I’m trying to narrow it down to 10.

It was just that missing out on all those games, or those milestones at home. Just the overwhelm that my wife was feeling, as somebody who works and an entrepreneur. Doing her thing. Missing out on the kids, in general. I don’t want my in-laws raising my kids. I want to raise them. I want to be in their lives. It was just a matter of understanding, like I said, that my work is to support my family. When I was coming home, and it felt uncomfortable, and it felt more comfortable to be gone, on the road, that’s when I realized there was a problem. That’s not the work-life balance.

I was listening to another podcast, and he took the approach of, not necessarily a work-life balance, but a work-life integration. How can the two work together? Understanding that I don’t have to carry the weight all by myself. Then, on the other side … Yes, my wife works as well, but there are some people out there where they are the sole provider for the family, right? When I’m talking about carrying the weight by myself, well, my spouse shouldn’t have to carry the weight of running the household by herself either, or himself. Whatever your situation is.

Clem Harrod - familyIt’s a matter of understanding, “Okay, when I’m gone, I need to stay connected to home. I have to stay connected to home. Think about what are the things that I can do, while I’m gone, to be connected?” Whether it’s setting up that schedule for my son to live by, to make sure he’s helping with getting himself ready, so that then my wife doesn’t necessarily have to stay on top of him every morning about do this, do that. Or, emailing a teacher to set up a meeting. If my son is taking private batting lessons, staying in contact with the coach via text message. There’s so many little things that we can do. Each person needs to think about their own situation, their own schedule. There are things that you can do to maintain that balance of your life, of your family life, while you’re gone.

Even if you don’t have a family, you have friends or you have things in your city that you want to do. It’s a matter of just keeping up with those things. Looking at the schedule of concerts that you might want to attend or texting your friends in a little text messaging group and say, “Hey, I’ll be back in town this day. Let’s make sure we get up.” Just planning out your life so your work and the road life doesn’t become your life.

Stephen Bowles:
It’s true. Hey, I always say, I took a couple month hiatus from gigging, met my wife, and we got married. It’s just the fact is if all you do is the work, then you will miss out. There’s things that are going to get sacrificed on.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s awesome, man. Yeah, we’re going to jump into that on another episode.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, that’s going to be a good episode.

Stephen Bowles:
It’s going to be good. All right, let’s take just another minute here. I want to hear about Projection 101. What in the world is it? I’ve heard rumors. You’ve mentioned it to me. I’ve heard people like … You’ve been hearing about it. You’ve seen the hashtags in your Instagrams. Just give us a taste of what Projection 101 is, in your mind.

clem harrod - clemco.av - projection 101Clem Harrod:
Yeah. Projection 101, for me, is not just a course. It’s not just a class that I’ll be taking, but it’s a lifestyle. Understanding what it took for me to get into this industry, and understanding where the demand was. “They need a projectionist.” “Okay, I’ll take on that role.” I didn’t know how to do it. Projection 101 is a course that I’ve developed to help people who are stage hands or just beginning event projectionists. Maybe a projectionist assist who wants to become a full time projectionist. Setting up that structure for them to understand what it takes for them to be a projectionist. Understanding that step by step process from being put onto a show, the entire pre-production process, to the load in, to striking. There are steps that you can take to help you to easily transition from that position that you’re in, to the position that you want to be.

Now, when I say that Projection 101 is a lifestyle as well, it’s also a matter of seeing yourself in one place in your life and seeing where you want to be. Understanding that you can be an architect of your own life. Plan out the steps to get where you want to be. That’s a whole other course. If you are a projectionist as well and you want to move beyond that basic level, or you are doing certain skills and you feel that you are into the blends, and stuff like that, but you want to sharpen your skills in other avenues, there’s also individual coaching that I’ll be offering, as well, to help people to, like I said, to sharpen their skills. Become a master of their craft and not just be stuck in one level. We are skilled individuals. We have a niche that we can grow in, and be prosperous for. Not only for ourselves, but for our families. That’s what Projection 101 is all about.

clem harrod - clemco.av - teachingStephen Bowles:
That’s awesome. I think the thing I love about it most is that it’s all about sharing information. Helping other people grow and learn. I think this industry is built on [inaudible 00:31:47], you know? The only way you even get a call from a random gig that you’ve never worked before is because somebody suggested you.

Clem Harrod:
Right, right.

Stephen Bowles:
Somebody spoke out for you and said, “Yeah, Clem can do widescreen event projection. Give him a call, he’ll take good care of you.” Making sure that we are intentional about that. Both in hooking people up with gigs, but also making sure people are learning. They’re growing in their craft. It’s not very clear what the upward ladder looks like in our industry because-

Clem Harrod:
Technology’s ever-changing.

Stephen Bowles:
Yeah. We’re not all in the same corporation that has the same title hierarchy, or anything like that. Being able to pour knowledge, skill, and trade craft into people, in an organized way, which is what you’re really talking about is.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s awesome.

All right, we’ve got to wrap. This has been-

Clem Harrod:
There’s a lot of chatter on this Production Channel, right now.

Stephen Bowles:
There’s a lot of chatter. This has been good. This is our first one. We’re going to keep bringing you guys some people from the industry. Again, we’re going to cover it all. We’re going to go between stage production, we’re going to go with pre-production, we’re going to to go into the media, the post, the whole gamut. We’ll take you through sports, and broadcast, through news, and back. Just know that this is what we’re here for. We are the Production Channel. Whether or not you’re traveling from gig to gig and you need something to listen to on the plane or while you’re in the terminal, this is what we got. This is a place to come to. If you’re backstage and you’ve got a boring CEO on the stage, and he’s been chattering forever. You can either watch Netflix, or cruise Facebook. Please come to the Production Channel.

Clem Harrod:
Sharpen your skills.

Stephen Bowles:
Awesome content. Sharpen your skills. Learn a thing, learn something about what another person is doing in this industry. Also, reach out to us. Reach out to Clem, reach out to me, and really send us those stories. If you feel like you’ve got an excellent thing or a particular craft you want to share, hit us up. We want to know about it.

With that, Clem, what hashtags or whatever can they find you on Instagram?

Clem Harrod:
Oh man, you can find me on Instagram all day. I’m under @CLEMCO.AV. I also have a personal one, @Tuvac15. My hashtag, #Projection101. It’s a lifestyle, all day.

Stephen Bowles:
That’s awesome. All right, thank you so much. Tune in next time for the Production Channel.

Clem Harrod:
Chatter!

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