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[PODCAST EP13] Corporate Audio Design with Billy Walsh

Billy Walsh feature image
Billy Walsh feature image

We’re all ears this week at The Production Channel as Clem Harrod interviews long-time audio designer, Billy Walsh. Billy is an industry staple in the corporate event world with almost 40 years of audio experience, and due to his positive energy and solid work ethic, everybody knows when Billy Walsh is in the room.

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Billy got his start in the entertainment world as a young guitarist and secured professional gigs at the age of 15. At a turning point just after high school, he went to an Army recruiter who got him an audition for the West Point Jazz Band. Long story short, Billy aced the audition and became the West Point Jazz Band guitarist for 12 years. Due to his frustration with cutbacks in the Army, he realized he needed to make a change, and in 1988, he connected with a friend who had the AV contract for IBM. Billy made the big jump into the AV world–and he’s been doing corporate audio ever since.

When asked about his longevity in the live event production industry, he says, “I just think it’s the caliber of the people that I’m working with that…I mean, I still love traveling and walking into this room that’s got nothing in it and turning it into a theater and having this amazing thing happen from nothing.” Billy realizes mentoring aspiring audio designers is important to the future of the industry so he takes the time to share his knowledge out of the passion of the business. One of his key pieces of advice is, “If you don’t like what you’re doing, get out because you’re that angry guy. You’re that angry guy in the ballroom that nobody wants to be around.” So far, Billy still loves his job and has future hopes of making a living from his basement studio.

Listen in as Clem and Billy share lots of laughs philosophizing on the creation of corporate shows, the trials of staying connected to family while on the road, and how learning new technology keeps a seasoned audio guy on his toes.

Full Podcast Transcript

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, it is. So, I’m sitting here with the man himself, Mr. Billy Walsh. Billy, Billy, Billy.

Billy Walsh:
Oh yeah.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, man. So, how’d you get to start in the industry? Let’s start there.

Billy Walsh:
Well, let’s see. Everything I’ve ever done was somehow connected to music. I mean, from high school to today, I was a guitar player. And girlfriend I was going out with, she wanted to be a dental assistant. She went into the United States Army to be a dental assistant. Well, I was going to follow her and went to a recruiter one day. He was asking what I wanted to do. I said, “I’m interested in electronics. I play guitar and constantly blowing my amplifier.” I wanted to learn how to fix the thing.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
It’s kind of a little expensive.

Clem Harrod:
Right, right.

Billy Walsh:
So, he asked me … He goes out of the blue. He goes, “So, you play guitar.” He says, “You wanna be the guitar player in the West Point jazz band?” Out of the blue. I was like, “Well, I know the job of a recruiter is to sell.” So, I was very cautious.”

Clem Harrod:
Make it all fancy for you.

Billy Walsh:
Absolutely. I was just being very cautious. He said, “No. I’ll call ’em up. We’ll get an audition.” That afternoon, we went out to West Point. I auditioned on guitar. I got accepted to the band and played guitar in the West Point jazz band for the next 12 years.

Clem Harrod:

Wow.

Billy Walsh:
I was sergeant in the army, ended up staff sergeant after 12 years. Well, after 12, I couldn’t hang anymore. There were a lot of things going on in the army, a lot of cutbacks. We were losing gear. I had enough of it. A friend of mine from across the river who had the AV contract for IBM in Poughkeepsie, he was a fan of the band I was playing in, and he goes, “Hey. Why don’t you come work for me?” So, this was in 1988. I’ve been doing corporate audio ever since that day.

Clem Harrod:
What? Since 1988, a friend just was like, “Hey, come work with me over on this corporate show”?

Billy Walsh:
Yeah.

Clem Harrod:
Wow.

Billy Walsh:
So, I said, “It’s funny. I’m here doing an IBM show.”

Clem Harrod:
I know, right. That’s what I’m saying. We’re sitting here on an IBM show, and that was … You said, “1988”?

Billy Walsh:
Yeah.

Clem Harrod:
So, that was what? 40 years ago?

Billy Walsh:
Yeah.

Clem Harrod:
98 …

Billy Walsh:
30-something.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, 39 years, man.

Billy Walsh:
Right. But it’s not Poughkeepsie [crosstalk 00:02:58], right?

Clem Harrod:
No, no, no, no. It’s not. It’s not. As we sit here and enjoy our view of New York-New York Hotel, Excalibur, little pieces of the MGM and sipping on a bottle of wine.

Billy Walsh:
Not Poughkeepsie.

Clem Harrod:
Not Poughkeepsie. Speaking of … Well, let’s go back. Let’s go back. Let’s go back. Tell me about young Billy Walsh, like young Billy Walsh, before army recruiter, all that.

Billy Walsh:
Wow. That’s a good one, man. Catholic school, seven years of Catholic school. Play guitar, always playing guitar. The masses …

Clem Harrod:

Well, how’d you get into the guitar? I mean, how did …

Billy Walsh:
My dad. It’s all down to my dad. My dad was a drummer.

Clem Harrod:
What’s his name? What was his …

Billy Walsh:
Billy Walsh.

Clem Harrod:
Billy Walsh. Oh, so you’re Junior?

Billy Walsh:
I’m Junior.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
And he played drums. He worked for Pfizer.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
He was in research at Pfizer in Groton, Connecticut. He did that for 35 years. Every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday night he played drums in a strip club in New London, Connecticut.

Clem Harrod:
So, you grew up in Connecticut?

Billy Walsh:
I did.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
I’m southeast in Connecticut. When I was seven, he brought me, my sister and my younger brother into a music store and he said, “Pick something out and you’re gonna take lessons on it and you’re gonna learn how to play it.” There was a guy over in the corner playing this Gretsch Duo guitar and I was like, “Oh yeah.”

Clem Harrod:
That was it for you.

Billy Walsh:
“I want that.”

Clem Harrod:
So, you have siblings?

Billy Walsh:
Yeah. I have an older sister, younger brother.

Clem Harrod:
Okay, and what they pick?

Billy Walsh:
My brother was drums. My sister picked piano.

Clem Harrod:
Okay, okay, so did you all have the full-out band going or …

Billy Walsh:
With us, no, but I do have a photo of my first gig, which is me and my dad playing. It was at one of my cousin’s wedding. So, something like that.

Clem Harrod:
So, young Billy picks up a guitar, starts playing and that’s kind of his thing. He feels it.

Billy Walsh:
Oh yeah, oh yeah. It was not long after that. I started playing in bands. The Beatles coming out and it was … Everybody wanted to be the Beatles. And just started playing in clubs. I was about 15. Started hitting the bars, playing in the bars with the bands.

Clem Harrod:
Drinking at the bars at 15.

Billy Walsh:
Oh yeah, man. Sloe Gin Fizz was the choice.

Clem Harrod:
That’s cool, that’s cool.

Billy Walsh:
It was a lot of fun.

Clem Harrod:
So, then, we fast-forward, so you’re playing in high school. Were you involved in anything else? Were you involved in the engineering side at all or was it just listen [crosstalk 00:05:46] in the ear?

Billy Walsh:
No, no. It was just playing. I mean, high school, I played football and I was in the jazz band. They call it a stage band, the high school stage band. So, that’s where I learned to read charts, read the big band charts, which was funny because when I went to my audition at West Point, they brought out charts.

Clem Harrod:
So, you were already prepared.

Billy Walsh:
Two of them were the exact same charts that we had played in high school, so …

Clem Harrod:
So, that helped?

Billy Walsh:
… it helped out.

Clem Harrod:
You were prepared. That was that pre-production aspects. So, you were there and able to execute the show?

Billy Walsh:
Absolutely, yeah.

Clem Harrod:
Nice. All right. So, first day on the job or one of the first days, the first week on the job in the corporate world doing your show. Do you remember any of that? What was that experience?

Billy Walsh:
Oh yeah. I was working with my mentor. My mentor was a very well-known sound guy named Pete Lewis. Pete kind of took me under his wing and showed me what’s going on. I guess he must’ve liked something that I did, but he really, really gave me constant instruction and advice. I hadn’t even … I had no idea what corporate was. I had been coming right out of the band at West Point. It’s quite a change, but he, man … He really showed me what was going on with the hierarchy and all the theater aspect of it because it was always me on stage playing to an audience. Now, it was me supporting what was on stage. It was a whole …

Clem Harrod:
The mind shift.


Billy Walsh:

… different deal. I know that it helps me out now when we have talent and I can talk to them. They can hear certain things that I say that they know I’m a player and not somebody that’s telling them how they’re supposed to be.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Billy Walsh:
I kind of let them know that that my job is to take their sound and get it to the audience instead of me tailoring to what I think their sound should be. So, it’s kind of a different …

Clem Harrod:
So, it’s truly getting into the essence of them and what they are about …

Billy Walsh:
Absolutely.

Clem Harrod:
… and helping to amplify or magnify that for the rest of the audience?

Billy Walsh:
Right, because I don’t have any preconceived notion as to what that band should sound like. Everyone has a whole new different thing. So, instead of going on stage and saying, “Give me some kick drum,” I like to say, “Just go up there and play for a little while. I got some things to do. Why don’t you guys just play and get comfortable with the stage, comfortable with the sound,” and then we’ll add to that instead of constructing something from the first brick.

Clem Harrod:
Well, that’s speaking on the musician side of you. Now, how do you deal with clients when they’re up there and they’re different …

Billy Walsh:
That’s where I think the wise guy, wise cracking, always try to make it funny. That’s always been my misdirection to take pressure off or to … I don’t know. Sometimes it makes them feel at ease, and sometimes it puts them way uncomfortable. I just get really sarcastic and try to say it in a way that it’s funny to disarm them and just to try to get a rapport with them. Sometimes it works, sometimes not so much.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, I’m sure. I know a lot of people listening have their own Billy Walsh story, and little sarcastic remarks or memories that just kind of stick in. I wasn’t there, but one that I’ve definitely heard was the Hawaii story, like right outside the curtain.

Billy Walsh:
Oh [crosstalk 00:09:55].

Clem Harrod:
So, let’s talk about that one.

Billy Walsh:
Well, we’re in Maui. First time I’d been to Maui. It wasn’t much of a show. For some reason, we were in this ballroom from 6:00 a.m. until 10 o’clock at night.

Clem Harrod:
In Maui?

Billy Walsh:
In Maui. Even the producer was like, “What are you people doing on headset?” And the stage manager would actually be sitting there reading the newspaper while we were on headset. We’d be like, “Hey … ”

Clem Harrod:
So, you all aren’t rehearsing?

Billy Walsh:
No, no. There was maybe couple hours till the next [inaudible 00:10:37] flight was going to land.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
We had to be in the ballroom. We had to be on headset and it was … I couldn’t get it. I didn’t understand. Then I just looked at the stage and I go, “Hey, you know what’s outside? [inaudible 00:10:52] Hawaii.” He looked at me. He’s like, “What does that … What does that mean?” He had no concept of look what we’re missing. You know?

Clem Harrod:
Right, right, right, yeah. I mean, because that’s the thing. We spend a lot of time in the ballroom. We do. We spend a lot of time, like here. Here, we’re working 13-hour days and I would come up to my room and that would be the first time that I saw outside since I left the room. I was like, “Oh it’s dark out.” I had no idea.

Billy Walsh:
Absolutely.

Clem Harrod:
I had no idea. Even in all of that with missing certain aspects of life, how do you stay connected still? Like to your family and not miss out on things like that?

Billy Walsh:
Just a lot of … Like now, it’s a lot of texting, sending pictures, lot of that stuff. When I’m home, it’s like very intensive. Lot of time together, lot of meals together, and do a lot of cooking.

Clem Harrod:
Oh, you cook?

Billy Walsh:
Oh yeah.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah?

Billy Walsh:
Yeah, yeah. Nothing fancy, but mass quantities of whatever it is.

Clem Harrod:
Is that the old military style?

Billy Walsh:
I guess, man, I guess.

Clem Harrod:
I’m just cooking for a lot of people.

Billy Walsh:
Oh man, that’s funny. I never thought of it that way. That may be. I have [inaudible 00:12:23] house and it seems that a lot of times when I go home, everybody’s like, “Hey, why don’t you stop over?” Or, “Let’s go out to a restaurant and eat.” I want absolutely the opposite of that. I haven’t been home. I want to stay home and I want to be home. I want to cook. I want to eat a home-cooked meal. So, I’d make it easy for them, “Come on over. I’ll feed you. Come on over and hang out.”

Clem Harrod:
So, you don’t mind the company?

Billy Walsh:
Oh no.

Clem Harrod:
You just want to be in your environment, home and not have to prepare meals like we often times do on the road.

Billy Walsh:
Yeah.

Clem Harrod:
I get that. I definitely get that. I want to jump back to work a little bit. What is it about this industry that keeps you going?

Billy Walsh:
You know what? I thought about this a lot and I have come to absolutely no conclusion whatsoever, but it’s got to be the people that I’m working with. It’s got to be, because it can’t be the client. It just can’t be.

Clem Harrod:
Right, because sometimes we don’t even know what you’re talking about.

Billy Walsh:
It can’t be boss. I just think it’s the caliber of the people that I’m working with that … I mean, I still love traveling and walking into this room that’s got nothing in it and turning it into a theater and having this amazing thing happen from nothing and then walking out the door and there’s four chairs and a table.

Clem Harrod:
Right, right. After we clean up and put everything back. I like to use the analogy of Legos. You take a box of Legos and that’s that that’s 53-foot trailer and you just dump into the room and you divide the Legos by department like, okay, you go over here and work on that. You go over and work on that and we’re going to take this over here and work on that. And we build our little piece. And then we put some of the pieces together. We keep building little pieces and we keep them together. And then we’ve got this beautiful set, this beautiful Erector Set that people come in. They look at it. They enjoy it. They’re part of it. We create experience and then we break all those Lego pieces back down …

Billy Walsh:
That’s it.

Clem Harrod:
… put ’em in the box and it goes away.

Billy Walsh:
Never seizes to amaze me what happens.

Clem Harrod:
As you’re talking about the people too, I love how we are all such a group of professionals, individuals that travel around the country, around the world and we’re respected and we do our job, but we’re still different. If you think about where you live, it’s more so your neighborhood and it’s more so similar demographic in some sort. But yet when we come together at work, it’s just a mixture of so many different people from all over the place. I enjoy it.

Billy Walsh:
I love it the way it just … There’s the instant connection, a total focus on, “I need to make … ” Like go to the Legos. “I need to make this structure here. And I need to make it quick. I need to make it right the first time, and then I need to make sure that the cable that connects from this block of Legos to that block works, talks to it and becomes part of this whole picture.”

Clem Harrod:
Now, when that cable though isn’t working right, how do you manage that and even in where it could be a stressful environment? How do you manage those moments?

Billy Walsh:
I’ll probably again start making jokes about it. Disarm, disarm, and then move in and do just a proven way of troubleshooting and make it work or get a workaround, one or the other, but it’s got to go.

Clem Harrod:
Now, those type of methods and those type of mentality of diverting attention with the humor and then going in and attacking and stuff like that, like that’s a proven method that’s worked for you. A friend of ours, mutual friend of ours, Jonathan Clark is in this business and doing his thing.

Billy Walsh:
Love that guy.

Clem Harrod:
Love that guy. Another tall fellow. In this job, he kind of set things up for you because you came in a couple days later than us, but he understands you. He understands your methods, your system and that’s from learning and you teaching. How do you go about teaching people like that or encouraging people? Because it’s about you seeing to be a person … Not seeing it to be … I know from years of working with you that you’re a person of character. You’re a person that … Well, you are a character, but you …

Billy Walsh:
So is Daffy Duck.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah, so is Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd. But I definitely felt when I came into the industry that you were somebody that cared about the people that you work with and cared about … You see something in somebody, you encourage them. You help them to be better. What is your thought process on that? Because there are some people that want to hoard information, but there are others who are willing to share.

Billy Walsh:
Right. Let’s go back to Jonathan Clark just for a moment because I have to say, he didn’t just set up my stuff for the show. I was busy on another show and I couldn’t come in for the [inaudible 00:18:09]. When I walked into that room, I mean, it was like somebody had taken my measurements and custom-made this cockpit for me to sit in that it was above and beyond anything that I expected anybody to do. He took the time and was thoughtful enough to think of more than just plug in this cable into that cable and [crosstalk 00:18:35]. I just got to say that this was amazing, but I like to time to tell younger people what I’ve learned and experiences I’ve had. I think it is absolutely directly connected to going back to Pete Lewis when I came into the business.
I mean, it was … He never made me feel that I was bothering him. He never, never made us feel that it was an imposition for him to explain anything, never talked down to me like, “You should know this,” kind of an attitude and never ever was hint of that. It was all out of just the passion of the business. We just happened to love what we’re doing and it’s just so easy to share anything, any information I have. Some of it is useful.

Clem Harrod:
A lot of it’s useful, not just some of it. Don’t minimize it. Oh man. So, even with that and teaching and giving back, I know that you were full-time for a while and you’re living in Orlando, but then you moved to Upstate New York, not far from West Point, right?

Billy Walsh:
Yep.

Clem Harrod:
Right up the river … Down the river or up the river.

Billy Walsh:
About 15 minutes west of West Point.

Clem Harrod:
West of West Point. And part of that was to be closer to your family.

Billy Walsh:
Absolutely. That was 100%. That was 100%.

Clem Harrod:
How many kids do you have?

Billy Walsh:
I have one daughter.

Clem Harrod:
One daughter.

Billy Walsh:
She’s got four of her own. So, I’ve got four grandchildren.

Clem Harrod:
And I knew that was important to you. So, I know you give back to us on the road, but how much does it mean to you to be home and closer to them, to be able to give back to them?

Billy Walsh:
It’s almost indescribable. Just recently, I went home. It was for a couple of days, but it was the right couple days. It’s always a crapshoot when you’re home. You might be home when the school play’s happening. You might be home when the championship ball game was going on. More times than not, you’re not there when it happens. There are ways to stay connected. A lot of the games are live stream.

Clem Harrod:
Oh right, true.

Billy Walsh:
There’s a couple different programs where they have avatars of the game going on where somebody’s there uploading every play. So, I do that a lot. Just recently, I went home and my oldest grandson, 15, started playing guitar about six months ago. He was like, “Yeah, we’re doing our winter recital at a local bar in town,” and there he was playing on stage, and it was [inaudible 00:21:30]. I’m videotaping. I’m trying to take a video with my [crosstalk 00:21:35].

Clem Harrod:
Audio guy doing video. I’m scared. I’m scared.

Billy Walsh:
Well, you know how this ends. So, he starts to play a solo and I’m like, “What! He’s playing … I’m gonna zoom in,” and immediately shut off the camera …

Clem Harrod:
Oh no.

Billy Walsh:
… and missed the solo. So, it was a sound guy running a video camera with expected results.

Clem Harrod:
Right, right, right, but the memory is still right here embedded.

Billy Walsh:
Oh, the moment right up to when the camera shut off was awesome.

Clem Harrod:
Oh man. So, your years of experience in this industry, what are a few words of wisdom that you can give to …

Billy Walsh:
If you don’t like what you’re doing, get out, because you’re that angry guy. You’re that angry guy in the ballroom that nobody wants to be around. If it’s something you love, I can’t stop it. I’m 63 years old and I still look forward to it. I like sitting down and doing the pre-production, doing the drawings, doing … You know?

Clem Harrod:
Yeah.

Billy Walsh:
I still love it and I still can’t figure out why. I don’t know. I don’t know what it is.

Clem Harrod:
It’s that little boy still playing with those Legos.

Billy Walsh:
I guess so. I guess so.

Clem Harrod:
So, drawings, before we go … Drawings, how long did it take you to understand that aspect of it?

Billy Walsh:
A long time. A long time. The whole [inaudible 00:23:09] works, AutoCAD, all that stuff, and how to use it, how to read it and how to get the information that you need to get into it. It took me a long time. I’m not that computer literate. So, all of the process is … Even something as simple as drag and drop, I will select a speaker array and bring it over and set it down and there’ll be two-thirds of the array that makes it over.

Clem Harrod:
So, the other part is over there like, “No, it’s not supposed to be there.”

Billy Walsh:
Yeah, but I don’t even see that.

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Billy Walsh:
I think, “Okay, I’m done with that and I move onto this.” And then the rigger calls me up and he goes, “Do you really want those two speakers over there … ”

Clem Harrod:
Those random two …

Billy Walsh:
“Backstage hanging at 20 feet?”

Clem Harrod:
Well, that goes to show that collaborative effort that it takes, the rigger sees the little thing that … Little mishap, but he’s going to be there to support you, to help you, and that’s what we are. It’s like that family.

Billy Walsh:
[inaudible 00:24:21] right.

Clem Harrod:
Those people to come back and help you out and be there to support you and …

Billy Walsh:
The newer technical stuff really throws me. For me, digital console is a new thing. I’m the guy that would … You want to adjust the trim of a certain channel? You reach for that channel and you just turn the knob. Now, you have to select the channel you want. [inaudible 00:24:46] we want control [inaudible 00:24:48] for that, for every channel. That throws me. I get frustrated a lot. But then, again, it’s still fun learning it. I go kicking and screaming. I’m still … I’ve got a very large CD collection. I don’t know when the last time I played a CD was …

Clem Harrod:
Right, right.

Billy Walsh:
And hold onto that stuff.

Clem Harrod:
Well, speaking of boards and CDs, I saw a picture of you mastering an album. It was on your Facebook page. It’s like this … You were sitting in front of a huge board.

Billy Walsh:
Oh, that’s my basement.

Clem Harrod:
Okay.

Billy Walsh:
That’s my basement, and I think my nephew put them in. He had done stuff. We were using the studio, but I love that basement. My family has a lot of fun down there. There’s some pretty intense karaoke sessions that go on.

Clem Harrod:
And some instruments down there, I saw that.

Billy Walsh:
Yeah, there’s a lot. There’s a lot. It is the equivalent of my man cave. This business that I’m in is kind of a means to that end. I would love to end up some day just making a nice living from my basement, produce some stuff and playing stuff. I write some stuff. That’d be nice.

Clem Harrod:
Okay, you write as well. Do you ever play any of your … Or have you ever performed or played any of the stuff that you’ve written at your crew parties, the crew parties that happen from time to time?

Billy Walsh:
I have indeed.

Clem Harrod:
Yeah?

Billy Walsh:
I have indeed, yeah. I played an original song that I wrote. Of course, original, I wrote it. It’s a song that … The title of it is No Matter How Much I Make I’m Still Working For Less.

Clem Harrod:
Was there a pun there?

Billy Walsh:
Some people read into it, but I’ve played that live at crew parties, but I’ve heard two of my songs while in an airplane flying at 30,000 feet. I had sold a couple of instrumentals that I did to the weather channel.

Clem Harrod:
What.

Billy Walsh:
They would play it, “Now weather on the eights,” and there’d be some instrumental behind that. Two of the songs that I wrote, they put on a playlist and I would get $2.40 every time they would play it. They played one song over 1600 times.

Clem Harrod:
Wow.

Billy Walsh:
And another one somewhere over 900 times. So, I actually got checks from BMI, stuff that I wrote and that was a pretty good feeling.

Clem Harrod:
I mean, you’ll continue to get those checks as long as they play, right?

Billy Walsh:
They don’t anymore. Now they went …

Clem Harrod:
Oh okay.

Billy Walsh:
What they did a couple years, they went and had a guy write a bunch of stuff around a single theme. There’s maybe 10 different versions of the same thing and they just rotate that in and out. So, it’s kind of a one-time buyout, so they don’t have to …

Clem Harrod:
Right.

Billy Walsh:
It’s license-free or they own it. They own the rights to it. They don’t have to deal with the BMI ASCAP stuff anymore, but that was cool, let me tell you.

Clem Harrod:
I bet, I mean, that’s just another way of leaving a mark. I will say that you definitely are continuing to leave a mark on this industry.

Billy Walsh:
Some people say it’s a stain.

Clem Harrod:
I’m going to disagree with those people. I’m going to disagree. I’m going to disagree. So, to close it out, I just want to say thank you for being you and thank you for bringing that positive energy to the ballroom. Everybody knows when Billy Walsh is in the room.

Billy Walsh:
Thanks.

Clem Harrod:
It’s been a great, man. Thank you.

Billy Walsh:
Thank you. Hey, thanks for what you guys are doing. This is pretty neat. I love listening to the interviews. It’s a really cool thing, man.

Clem Harrod:
Thanks, man. We’re having fun doing it. We’re just bringing more of the voice of the people who do the work to life. We’re a lot of times behind the scenes. Why not bring us up front and center?

Billy Walsh:
I love it. Thanks, man.

Clem Harrod:
Thank you.


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